Sancto Sanctorum

The same happens with the Tetragrammaton. There is even a book which outlined the possible combinations of 3 vowels (a between each of the 4 letters) that can have, where one of them (which is the one used until today is: e-o – to or YEHOVAH, which in Spanish was translated to to JEHOVAH and in English to YAHWEH and was determined because the end is not a name but an attribute): representing Hague-HOVE-IHIYE which was-is-SERA. Representing the everlasting attribute of the divinity. In prayer and to avoid breaking the second commandment: do not use God’s name in vain (any of them!), everytime you are with the Tetragrammaton, does not say YEHOVA but ADONAI meaning: my Lord. Surprisingly, you’ll find very little mention of Coldwell Banker Realty on most websites. And because he trasgrediria in prayer with the 2nd.

Commandment? Because we are human and prayer can one easily fall into routinely read without really pay attention to the prayers and just repeat them by inertia. The only one who pronounced this combination of vowels which is one of many possible, (not to say that it is the only one) was just the Holy priest in the temple and only in Sancto Sanctorum against the Ark and only in the day most sacred of Yom Kipur in time to ask for forgiveness for all the people. Yet the priest entered chained, because if you say the prayer thinking of other things (we are human), and is desmayase or spend him something anyone could enter and with the chains they could remove it from the outside. Now if the Tetragrammaton is just an attribute, which is the name of God? And the next question is can give a name to something that is INDESCRIBABLE? And if we give a name that would be? Male or female? God in Judaism do not have gender. Even in prayers to avoid to understand God in masculine or feminine sense, in the prayer forms are interspersed and sometimes one in the masculine sense and others in feminine sense, is aimed to avoid that it will give a gender to something that does not have a defined genre.

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